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Who Discovered the Big Dipper

 Who Discovered the Big Dipper
Introduction The Big Dipper is a group of seven stars. They are a part of the constellation known as Ursa Major. The Big Dipper is so located that it can be used as a point of reference to find other star groups. For example the North Star can be found in a straight line above starting from the two foremost stars of the ladle shape. Because the Big Dipper is clearly visible at night to the naked eye, it must have been known to mankind for as long as he has lived on earth. Discovery and Names of the Big Dipper in Ancient History No single person discovered the Big Dipper. It has been known and catalogued as a group since the earliest civilizations. Many names have been given to the Big Dipper by different peoples. In Britain the cluster of stars was seen as a Plough, Charlie and His Wagon or the Butcher’s Cleaver. In Ireland it was called the Starry Plough and was reputed to have political relevance. Scandinavians probably corrupted the name Charlie and His Wagon to Karlsvogna....

Who Discovered Iron?

Who Discovered Iron?
Iron is a very useful element and is well used today. A lot of our modern day conveniences come because of its uses. It has become a backbone for many structures that we construct. It is also a basic material for many of the innovations we now enjoy. We use iron to make steel and other alloys to answer various needs of our every day lives. Because of the many uses of this interesting element, some have wondered just who discovered iron. Metals of Antiquity It is not possible for anyone to say who it was or which people exactly where the first to use this element. We just can’t tell who discovered iron since it has been used by many people even from ancient times. Iron is classified along with other seven metals that are dubbed as The Metals of Antiquity. These include gold, copper, silver, lead, tin, iron, and mercury. All these metals were already known to the ancient peoples of Greece, Egypt, Rome, and Mesopotamia. Early History It is known that nobody was able to make use of iron before...

Who Discovered Saturn?

Who Discovered Saturn?
Few facts about Saturn need to be clarified as much as its discovery. The Romans, Greeks and Hindus all knew of its existence. Galileo did not discover Saturn in the 17th century, but he was the first to study its rings. Facts and Figures Saturn has an equatorial diameter of 107,500 km and a polar diameter of 119,600 km. its perihelion is 1,349,000 km; the aphelion is 1,508,900 km and the mean is 1,500,000 km. The rotation is 10.66 hours. Saturn has a revolution of 29.45 years. It has more than 60 satellites, all of which have orbits. Surface and Geology One of the established facts about Saturn is that it’s flat at the poles while projecting at the equator. This makes it more oblate than other planets. Another notable trait is that its density is less than water. However it has a dense core brought about by the gaseous atmosphere. Saturn is 20% smaller than Jupiter but its mass is only 95 times that of Earth. By contrast, Jupiter has a mass 300 times that of Earth. Its internal structure...

Who Discovered Zero?

Who Discovered Zero?
Who discovered zero? Discovery of Zero We can’t say for sure who discovered zero before anyone else. But the oldest records of its use are found in the ruins of Babylonia in circa 300 BC. The Babylonians were the first to invent a place hold number system, that is the use of a number to “compress” and cycle figures for easier counting and representation. While our modern system uses 10 as its place value, they used the number 60. This is the sexigesimal system used when counting minutes and seconds today. Babylonian Use of Zero The Babylonians, however, only used zero as a place holder. In other words, it was to clarify representation of numbers in written form. The Babylonians used cuneiform symbols called wedges and crescents to stand for numbers. To avoid confusion with large numbers (for example, 40 X 40 + 1 versus 40 + 1), they invented a zero symbol to mean a blank, a break. But they did not quite think of zero as a number. Zero and the Mayan Calendar At about 400 AD, the Mayans...

Who Discovered the Quadratic Formula?

Who Discovered the Quadratic Formula?
When it comes to cracking complex number riddles, equally complex number formula should be used. This is where a quadratic equation comes in. Breakthroughs in advanced science and mathematics became possible through the help of a quadratic equation. Incidentally, who discovered the quadratic formula? Numbers and Letters Quadratic formula makes us of not just numbers but also letters in an equation. To solve for an unknown value, letters took its place in the equation. An example of this is the Pythagorean formula. The Babylonians were said to have used a similar equation in their math problems. However, their use of it was only in a partial sense. The Babylonian equation system should have been more complex for some mathematicians to consider that a Babylonian was who discovered the quadratic formula. Two Indian Mathematicians Brahmagupta: An Indian mathematician from Brahma-Sphuta-Siddhanta used a complex number and letter algebraic system. Aside from this, he also considered negative...