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Who Discovered Radioactivity?

Who Discovered Radioactivity?
Radioactivity has always been around since it is a natural part of the environment we have. It is said to be emitted by some of those things that we use everyday like the computer monitors and TV screens. Hospitals even use radiation for x-rays and other medical purposes. But who discovered radioactivity and made its usage possible? The Early Discovery of Radioactivity A Frenchman named Henri Becquerel is said to be the person who discovered radioactivity. In the year 1896, Becquerel got some naturally fluorescent minerals to be used in an in-depth experiment. The purpose of the experiment was to study the properties of x-rays. The properties were already discovered a year ago by Wilhelm Roentgen, and Becquerel wanted to further examine it. In the experiment, what Becquerel did first was to expose potassium uranyl sulfate to the rays of the sun believing that the energy of the sun will be absorbed by the uranium and then emit it outwards as x-rays. After exposing the potassium uranyl...

Who Discovered the Four Moons of Saturn?

Who Discovered the Four Moons of Saturn?
One of the major planets in the Solar System, Saturn is comprised of 61 moons. It is popular for its four visible moons, namely Telesto, Prometheus, Dione and Titan. Aside from these, this planet also has hundreds of moonlets. In addition to these highly interesting details, it is also good to know certain information regarding its history including who discovered the four moons of Saturn. The Discovery of the Four Moons of Saturn Who discovered the four moons of Saturn? The first moon is Titan, which was discovered by Dutch astronomer Christiaan Huygens on March 25, 1655. The second one is Dione, which was discovered by Italian/French astrologer Giovanni Cassini in 1684. The third moon is called Prometheus, which was named after a powerful deity in Greek mythology. Stewart A. Collins discovered it sometime in October 1980. The fourth moon is named Telesto, which was named after a Greek mythological character. On April 8, 1980, astronomers John W. Fountain, Stephen M. Larson, Harold J....

Who Discovered Tin?

Who Discovered Tin?
One of the most amazing facts about tin is its usage since ancient times. There is evidence that Stone Age men used it 3,500 years ago. How the ancients discovered it is still a mystery. Discovery and History of Tin During the Late Stone Age people learned to put tin and copper together to produce bronze. Bronze was much easier to manipulate than copper and its use became widespread. This discovery ushered in the Bronze Age, which influenced the Egyptian, Mesopotamian and Indus Valley civilizations. Everything from weapons to utilities were fashioned from these materials. One of the oldest tin mining sites is in the Taurus Mountains in Turkey. An assessment of the facts about tin will show that usage of tin as a pure metal didn’t start until 600 BC. Tin was used heavily during the Medieval Ages, with Cornwall being one of the leading producers. Tin were also discovered and used in Asia. China, Laos and Indonesia were among the countries that also utilized the element. By 1931, the International...

Who Discovered Orion’s Belt?

Who Discovered Orion's Belt?
Introduction Orion’s Belt is an asterism of three stars in the Orion constellation. It is one of the most well-known constellations in the sky. The belt makes it easily discernible to the human eye. Because it is clearly visible, Orion’s Belt was known throughout the ancient world. No single astronomer discovered it. Features of Orion and Orion’s Belt The Orion constellation suggests the figure of a hunter with a belt around his waist. He appears to hold a club and shield in his hands. One of the stars representing the hunter’s legs is Rigel. It is the sixth brightest star in the heavens. Because of their brightness, Orion’s stars can be used to locate other stars such as Castor and Pollux and Sirius. The three stars of Orion’s Belt are named Alnitak, Alniham and Mintaka. Christian believers have identified them with ether the Three Magi who visited the child Jesus, and the three women named Mary in the Bible: Mary of Magdala, Mary of Cleopas and Mary the mother of the apostles...

Who Discovered Zero?

Who Discovered Zero?
Who discovered zero? Discovery of Zero We can’t say for sure who discovered zero before anyone else. But the oldest records of its use are found in the ruins of Babylonia in circa 300 BC. The Babylonians were the first to invent a place hold number system, that is the use of a number to “compress” and cycle figures for easier counting and representation. While our modern system uses 10 as its place value, they used the number 60. This is the sexigesimal system used when counting minutes and seconds today. Babylonian Use of Zero The Babylonians, however, only used zero as a place holder. In other words, it was to clarify representation of numbers in written form. The Babylonians used cuneiform symbols called wedges and crescents to stand for numbers. To avoid confusion with large numbers (for example, 40 X 40 + 1 versus 40 + 1), they invented a zero symbol to mean a blank, a break. But they did not quite think of zero as a number. Zero and the Mayan Calendar At about 400 AD, the Mayans...