RSS
people

Who Discovered Iron?

Who Discovered Iron?
Iron is a very useful element and is well used today. A lot of our modern day conveniences come because of its uses. It has become a backbone for many structures that we construct. It is also a basic material for many of the innovations we now enjoy. We use iron to make steel and other alloys to answer various needs of our every day lives. Because of the many uses of this interesting element, some have wondered just who discovered iron. Metals of Antiquity It is not possible for anyone to say who it was or which people exactly where the first to use this element. We just can’t tell who discovered iron since it has been used by many people even from ancient times. Iron is classified along with other seven metals that are dubbed as The Metals of Antiquity. These include gold, copper, silver, lead, tin, iron, and mercury. All these metals were already known to the ancient peoples of Greece, Egypt, Rome, and Mesopotamia. Early History It is known that nobody was able to make use...

Who Discovered Mitochondria

 Who Discovered Mitochondria
It is difficult to give one specific individual the credit for who discovered mitochondria. The entire course of development from the initial sighting to the eventual classification of the so-called power plant of the cell had a slow but steady progress, spanning over a century of research conducted by a succession of brilliant scientific minds. The history of mitochondria’s discovery began in 1857, when Swiss anatomist and physiologist Albert von Kolliker revealed the presence of granule-like structures in muscle cells. Kolliker’s claim was substantiated by other scientists at the time who had observed that the granules also appeared in other cell types. Then in 1886, a cytologist named Richard Altman employed a dye technique to identify the granules. Terming them “bioblasts,” Altman hypothesized that these organelles were the basic units of cell activity. It would be in 1898 that Carl Benda would rename the bioblast as “mitochondria,” taken from the Greek words “mitos”...

Who Discovered Electricity?

Who Discovered Electricity?
If you are thinking in the lines that it truly was Benjamin Franklin who discovered electricity, you may be surprised to know that there are current reports that actually do not support this particular idea. So who discovered electricity? Let’s check the historical notes. The Early Greeks The history accounts of electricity actually date back to a thousand years or more. This may point to the Ancient Greeks who were said to have discovered an attraction between fur and amber when rubbed together. The English Physician In 1600, there was a certain English physician by the name of William Gilbert who actually made a very important contribution to the history of electricity. Gilbert was the one who conned and first used the word, “electric.” This was taken the Greek word, “elektron” which actually pertains to that particular force that some substances produce or exert when they are rubbed against one another. The Famous Father of Electricity Going back to the known figure for the...

Who Discovered the Element Lithium?

Who Discovered the Element Lithium?
Represented by the atomic number 3 and symbol Li in the periodic table, lithium is described as a silver-white and soft metal. It is one of the alkali metals, which is generally considered the lightest amongst the various kinds of metals. Likewise, it is also the least dense amongst the different solid elements. More than anything else, it is known for its important uses in the fields of medicine, electronics and general engineering. The Discovery of Lithium Who discovered the element lithium? In 1817, a Swedish chemist named Johan August Arfwedson became the very first person to discover this chemical element. The result came from his analysis of a petalite ore. Before that, a Brazilian scientist named Jose Bonifacio de Andrade e Silva discovered lithium aluminum silicate or petalite in 1800. This finding was instrumental, particularly in the discovery of lithium. Swedish chemist Jons Jakob Berzelius named it ‘lithos,’ which later on was standardized as lithium. Additional Facts and...

Who Discovered the Constellation Aquarius?

Who Discovered the Constellation Aquarius?
Introduction The constellation Aquarius is one of the twelve signs of the zodiac. It is located in a region of the sky known as the Sea, called thus because of many water-related constellations in the area. These include Pisces (fish), Cetus (whale) and Eridanus (river). Aquarius itself is the sign of the Water Bearer. People often mistake it for a “watery” sign because of the use of water in its symbolism. According to astrologers, Aquarius is not a water sign but an air sign. It comes after Capricorn and before Pisces. Its ruling planets are Saturn and Uranus. The word “aquarius” means “cup bearer. Discovery and History of Aquarius Babylonian astronomers probably discovered the constellation Aquarius. They listed the constellation as marking the autumn equinox in September in 4000 BC. Aquarius is also featured in the star catalogues of Ptolemy, Eudoxos and Aratus. Ancient people visualized Aquarius as a man bearing a vessel of water and pouring it downwards. This is how it came...