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Who Discovered Venus?

Who Discovered Venus?
While a lot of facts about Venus are known, its actual discoverer is unknown. Among ancient civilizations it was known as the morning star. Pythagoras was the first to realize that both the morning and evening star were the same entity. Facts and Figures Venus has a perihelion of 107,600,000 and the aphelion is 108,900,000. The mean is 108,000,000. The rotation is approximately 243 days with a revolution of 0.52 years. It has no satellites and has an average temperature of 459 degrees Celsius. In terms of size, Venus is about the same as Earth. Surface and Geology One of the most basic facts about Venus is its size is similar to Earth. It is smaller by only 650 km. Its mass is also 80% that of Earth. However, Venus’ geological surface is very different. More than 75% of the surface is littered with volcanic plains. There are also several lobate plains in the area. There are two large landmasses, one on the northern hemisphere and one at the equator’s south side. The northern land...

Who Discovered Heart Disease?

Who Discovered Heart Disease?
In ancient times, most civilizations dealt with diseases and medical problems with the use of magic or occult practices. However, there were early records that Egypt treated diseases with basic medical know-how. And an Egyptian could well be the first person who discovered heart disease and provided some medical remedy. Ebers Papyrus Georg Ebers was not who discovered heart disease. However, he discovered a 110-page or 20-meter long scroll in hieratic Egyptian inscription around 1873 to 1874 in Thebes. It was a record of medical data made and kept by ancient Egyptians in 1550 B.C. Among its contents was how to detect heart failure. The Ebers Papyrus reflects a comprehensive Egyptian knowledge of the basics of heart failures and diseases and simple measure on how to treat them. With this fact, it would be safe to assume that the first heart doctor was an Egyptian. Some Early Clinical Heart Diagnoses The Ebers Papyrus described several clinical heart diagnoses made by the early Egyptians,...

Who Discovered Neon?

Who Discovered Neon?
Represented by the atomic number 10 and the symbol Ne in the periodic table, neon is another important chemical element with many practical applications. Under standard conditions, it is described as an inert and colorless noble gas. When used in neon lamps and discharge tubes, this element produces a unique reddish-orange color. Aside from these interesting details, it is also good to know something about its history particularly who discovered neon. The Discovery of Neon Who discovered neon? In 1898, English chemist Morris W. Travers and Scottish chemist William Ramsay discovered this all-important chemical element in the City of London in England. Aside from neon, they were also credited for discovering krypton and xenon. Ramsay chilled an atmosphere sample, which he then liquefied and warmed. As the liquid boiled off, he captured the gases and found three different elements, namely neon, xenon and krypton. Additional Facts and Other Interesting Information Years after the discovery...

Who Discovered Popcorn?

Who Discovered Popcorn?
The History and Discovery of Popcorn Popcorn is a variety of corn that bursts or “pops” out of its kernel when hot. The first people to discover they could pop corns were the American Indians about 5,000 years ago. Popcorn is thus one of the world’s oldest snacks. Other types of corn such as Indian corn, sweet corn, field corn and pod corn don’t have the popping quality. Early Cultivation, Use and Making of Popcorn The popcorn variety originated in Mexico where it was cultivated by the Native Americans. Archeological evidence have found ears of corn as old as 5,600 yearsLater on it was imported to India, Sumatra and China. It became popular with Europeans in exploration periods. They too brought the popcorn home with them. Popcorn was a challenging snack back then. To pop the kernels, the Indians threw them on hot stones over campfires. As the popcorn flew into the air, they would catch them and eat them. Eventually they grew tired of this and invented corn poppers that would...

Who Discovered Zero?

Who Discovered Zero?
Who discovered zero? Discovery of Zero We can’t say for sure who discovered zero before anyone else. But the oldest records of its use are found in the ruins of Babylonia in circa 300 BC. The Babylonians were the first to invent a place hold number system, that is the use of a number to “compress” and cycle figures for easier counting and representation. While our modern system uses 10 as its place value, they used the number 60. This is the sexigesimal system used when counting minutes and seconds today. Babylonian Use of Zero The Babylonians, however, only used zero as a place holder. In other words, it was to clarify representation of numbers in written form. The Babylonians used cuneiform symbols called wedges and crescents to stand for numbers. To avoid confusion with large numbers (for example, 40 X 40 + 1 versus 40 + 1), they invented a zero symbol to mean a blank, a break. But they did not quite think of zero as a number. Zero and the Mayan Calendar At about 400 AD, the Mayans...